Browse Tag by soy free
Brunch, Budget, Lunch, Main Dishes, Mediterranean, Recipe Makeover, Sides, Snacks

Grilled Artichokes + Vegan Wasabi Aioli

artichoke
I’ve never really liked veganaise, or vegan mayo. It reminds me of tuna salad. I do however, love artichokes. So do most people, I’ve learned…which should be a wonderfully convenient fact…yet somehow I get very turned off at the sight of artichokes (or any other vegetable for that matter) dipped in mayonnaise. Even if the mayo is vegan, I can’t deal..ever since I was 5 or 6 years old at a holiday party and witnessed a platter of steamed broccoli served with mayonnaise as a dip. I went through a phase in college when I could tolerate it because my roommate(s) always had it around and I was just grateful it wasn’t real mayo. Come to think of it, of all the 35 different roommates I have lived with since 2007, none of them ever bought mayonnaise yet somehow many of them had an affinity for veganaise, nayonaise, or whatever other vegan mayonnaise was available. I haven’t lived with many vegans, yet somehow found myself surrounded by the omnivores-who-prefer-vegan-condiments crowd.




Even though I’m not normally a fan of aioli , I thought I would try to make my own soy-free, paleo version. This one utilizes wasabi, an ingredient choice that occurred when I envisioned the different types of veganaise that once inhabited my refrigerator. If I recall correctly, wasabi mayo was among them. For this recipe I used sunflower seeds to create a creamy texture. I still had a few cashews left over (see previous post) so I used them also. The recipe is a 2-step process; first prepare the wasabi worcestershire, then blend with the sunflower seeds and cashews to create the aioli.

It turned out delicious, with flavors similar to the type of aioli traditionally served with artichokes…only without the egg-y undertones that mayonnaise-based versions often exhibit.

Grilled Artichokes with Vegan Wasabi Aioli

Ingredients

1-2 globe artichokes
1 lime slice, or extra for garnish
1 bay leaf
1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
2 Tbsp soy sauce
1/4 cup artichoke water/broth (see below)
1/16 tsp stevia extract powder
1 tsp stone-ground dijon mustard
1 tsp minced garlic
1 tsp granulated garlic or garlic powder (not garlic salt)
1 tsp blackstrap molasses
2 tsp wasabi powder

artichoke halved
artichoke half

Method

Cut the artichoke(s) in half. If you want a nice presentation, use scissors to snip away the pointy tips of the artichoke leaves. Boil artichokes in 3 cups water with the lime slice and bay leaf. Meanwhile, prepare the vegan wasabi worcestershire sauce and/or the aioli.

Preheat a grill or broiler on high heat.

When artichoke has finished boiling (about 20 minutes), carefully scoop out the “hair” from the heart and then transfer to the preheated grill or broiler. Cook until browned or when grill marks appear, about 5 minutes.

for the vegan wasabi worcestershire sauce
Stir with a fork or whisk together the soy sauce, minced garlic, garlic powder, blackstrap molasses, stevia extract, dijon mustard, and apple cider vinegar with 1/4 water/broth from the artichokes.




for the aioli
In a food processor or blender, combine 1/4 cup vegan wasabi worcestershire with 1/4 cup sesame seeds and 1/4 cup sunflower seeds. Blend until smooth. Add more artichoke water/broth in 1 Tbsp increments if additional liquid is needed.

Serve artichokes with vegan wasabi aioli and lime slices.

vegan wasabi worcestershire aioli
vegan artichoke aioli

Share on YummlyPin on PinterestShare on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someone
< 5 ingredients, Budget, Camp Stove, Frugal

Cooking Smart: Brussels Sprouts + Greens

brussels sprouts green kale

One thing you can do to significantly reduce your bill = cook smart. Whether your stove is gas or electric, or if you’re in a tent in the woods with only one match: here’s how you do it.

Object Lesson A: Brussel sprouts and greens
<--more-->
Let’s say you have brussels sprouts and some greens that have wilted slightly and/or would taste much more satisfying cooked. You have a pot to cook in with a lid, and a knife of some sort.

Trim brussels sprouts of any soiled leaves. If you have a knife, chop off the base of the sprouts (which can tend to be dirty).

Boil sprouts in enough water to cover them. Cover with lid to bring water to a boil more quickly. Once the water begins to boil, lift the lid and add a few shakes of salt if you have it. This will help tenderize the sprouts and reduce overall cooking time. Boil covered for 6-12 minutes. If you like them a bit softer, err on the side of 12.




Turn off heat and remove sprouts with a spoon or strainer, leaving the vegetable water in the pot. Immediately throw your greens into the pot. Cover with lid, allowing the heat from the water/vapor to cook the greens. The salt in the water will also tenderize the greens, allowing them to cook quickly and serve while the brussels sprouts are still warm. Serve with the broth/leftover water to warm your insides and to maximize nutrient intake. The brussels sprouts and broth taste taste delicious as is, but also when lightly seasoned with lemon juice and black pepper.

brussels sprouts greens brussels sprouts and kale brussels sprouts and greens

More Cooking Smart recipes to follow…

Share on YummlyPin on PinterestShare on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someone
Budget, Detox, Holiday, Lunch, Main Dishes, Salads, Sides

Green Bean Salad with Crushed Red Pepper


This recipe is inspired by something I found online when I Googled “green bean salads”. I found one that had a spicy and citrus-y flavor profile, with crushed walnuts. I’m allergic to walnuts, so I used pumpkin seeds instead. Since walnuts taste semi-sweet and pumpkin seeds do not, I added 1/16 tsp stevia extract to compensate. Also, in place of red pepper-infused olive oil I topped the salad with crushed red pepper flakes (the kind generally used as a pizza topping). Unlike the recipe that was its inspiration, this one is oil-free and calls for only 5 ingredients. Continue Reading

Share on YummlyPin on PinterestShare on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someone
Budget, Cleanse, Detox, Holiday, Lunch, Main Dishes, Salads, Sides

Romaine and Cucumber Salad with Pepitas, Cranberries, and Balsamic Vinaigrette

pumpkin seed romaine cucumber salad
To follow my 5 Salad Dressings ≤ 5 ingredients post, here is a salad ≦ 5. Most ingredients can be found at your average run-of-the-mill grocery store, and the salad as a whole tastes great with my oil-free balsamic vinaigrette.<--more-->
I just now realize how holiday-ish this recipe is. Pumpkin seeds, cranberries…Thanksgiving, anyone? Bookmark it for next fall. Tell your friends.

for the Balsamic Vinaigrette:

Ingredients

1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
1 Tbsp agave nectar
2 tsp Dijon mustard
1 tsp dried basil
Juice of 1 meyer lemon




This should make enough for two to three meal-size portions of salad. Ingredients in the salad i.e. dried cranberries and garlic have distinct flavor profiles and are meant to stand out. In other words, excess dressing might throw off the balance.

for the Salad:

Ingredients

1 head romaine lettuce, shredded or chopped
2/3 cup shelled pepitas/pumpkin seeds
1/4 cup dried cranberries
1 cucumber, finely chopped
1 tsp granulated garlic, or more to taste.

Mix. *Tip: throw all ingredients into a large pyrex container with lid. Cover tightly and shake. Remove lid, add dressing, and shake again. This method works well, and doubles as an arm workout.

*Things to consider: The recipe calls for granulated garlic, not garlic salt. Be sure to observe the difference. Granulated garlic is sold for under $1 per ounce, on the spice rack at Mexican markets or the “Hispanic Foods” section at grocery stores. Look for ajo in 1 or 2 oz plastic packets.

If you buy unsalted pepitas/pumpkin seeds, you might want to add a bit of salt to taste. I used salted pepitas for this recipe, so naturally I didn’t need any extra. To stay on the safe side, avoid the task of determining the perfect ratio. Just provide a salt shaker and everyone can doctor the salad to their liking.




I think this salad is genius, but I’d like to hear other opinions. If you try the recipe, please leave a comment to let me know what you think.

Share on YummlyPin on PinterestShare on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someone
Budget, Detox, Global Fusion, Lunch, Main Dishes, Mediterranean, Salads, Seaweed, Sides

5 Salad Dressing Recipes ≤ 5 ingredients

perfect salad
I’ve traveled a lot, in many situations where access to a blender was nil. Whether it was a motel room with a mini fridge, or a hospedaje with bars on the widows; a hostel dorm with a shared kitchen, a tent, or my car, I’ve managed to make every salad dressing on this list with as little as a pocket knife and a mason jar. That’s not to say they’re simplistic. These recipes can transform something as basic as shredded cabbage into a flavorful and satisfying meal.
Continue Reading

Share on YummlyPin on PinterestShare on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someone