Browse Tag by guatemala
Guatemalan, Italian, Sauce, Vegan Cheese

Broccoli Stalk Fettuccine + Roasted Tomatoes

broccoli stalk fettuccine
Pasta alternatives don’t have to cost $2 per serving. I enjoy using Shirataki noodles just as much as the next paleo enthusiast or carb-conscious person, but the cost adds up. So I thought, why not utilize an ingredient that many home cooks often throw out? I always use the stalk of the broccoli, but usually just add it along with the florets in soups, stir fries, and steamed vegetable dishes. It just occurred to me today to feature broccoli stalks as the star of a dish. The result? Even better than I predicted. Broccoli stalks, when thinly sliced, make a mean fettuccine noodle. The chickpea-cashew cream sauce pairs perfectly, but my favorite element would have to be the roasted tomatoes. Overall, this dish has aesthetic appeal and a lovely flavor profile. To make it even more budget-friendly, toasted sesame seeds can be substituted for the cashews.



Broccoli Stalk Fettuccine + Roasted Tomatoes

Ingredients

3 roma tomatoes, halved
2 broccoli stalks
salt, for cooking
1 cup toasted cashew pieces* (see how-to in the steps below)
1/2 cup cooked chickpeas
3/4 cup broccoli water
1 Tbsp garlic powder (not garlic salt)
1 Tbsp fresh lime juice or more, to taste
1 clove garlic
1 tsp crushed red pepper
3-4 peppercorns
Salt to taste

broccoli pasta ingredients

Method

Preheat oven to 350 degrees..

Using a mandolin (who am I kidding, I don’t own a mandolin) or a knife, slice strips from the broccoli stalks as thinly as possible. Then slice each slice as thinly as possible to create “noodles” (thinner than julienne, as long as the stalk will allow you to cut all the way without inducing breakage).

In a stove pot, bring 2 cups water to a boil. Add broccoli “noodles” and a pinch of salt. Cover, and reduce heat to medium-low.

chopping broccoli

*The purpose of/inspiration behind this recipe was to make use of broccoli stalks that are often discarded by home cooks and/or the general public—but if your broccoli still has florets attached, use them too.




When oven is ready, place roma tomatoes in an oven pan or on a cookie sheet. Lightly shake sea salt over tomatoes before transferring to the preheated oven.

raw tomatoes halved

Before you start the alfredo sauce…
When broccoli “noodles” are tender (7-10 minutes) use a strainer to extract the water/broth. Return pot of broccoli noodles to the stove, cover, and ignore while you focus on other the other elements in this dish.

broccoli stalk noodles

for the sauce…
Blend 1 cup toasted cashews* with 3/4 cup broccoli water/broth, 1/2 cup chickpeas, 3-4 peppercorns, 1 tsp red pepper flakes, 1 Tbsp garlic powder, and 1 Tbsp lime juice.

*to toast the cashew pieces…
you will need:
raw cashew pieces
a small cast-iron skillet or frying pan
a plate
a wooden spoon or pair of wooden chopsticks for stirring

cashew

Spread the nuts in a single layer in the skillet. Turn on heat to low (3-4). Stir regularly to ensure all sides are cooked. This takes 15 minutes, or until cashews are lightly brown. If you see traces of dark brown, don’t worry. When dry-roasted/toasted the traditional way in Guatemala, cashews develop spots that are more browned than others*.




*I found a youtube video for a how to make cashews (marañones) from start to finish (literally, the video shows the fruit picked directly from the tree). I’ve witnessed this process before but all I did was take an Instagram photo. I always wished I’d made a video. Now I found one. Shout-out to Arielhz45 for their well-made informative instructional video. The reason why most cashews you find at the grocery store in the bulk bins or pre-packaged by Planter’s or some other company = here in the grand old USA we tend to think everything tastes better with grease and salt. We roast cashew nuts in peanut oil (thanks, Planter’s) despite the fact that cashews have a high fat content already (the good, nutritious fat that comes from whole foods *note: when I write “whole foods” I don’t mean WFM. I write about WFM (Whole Foods Market) occasionally, so I can see how this might seem confusing. From now on, I will refer to Whole Foods Market as such, or I will abbreviate as WFM. When I discuss “whole foods” I mean whole foods as in unrefined, unadulterated, unprocessed foods and/or actual foods as opposed to fruit byproducts i.e. olive oil, grape seed oil, avocado oil, coconut oil, or seed byproducts e.g. sunflower, sesame, or canola. Also ingredients that aren’t used as fillers in practically every packaged food, such as the corn byproduct maltodextrin. Get it? Sorry if that sounded fragmented. If so, ask me to clarify via a comment, an email, or whatever other means of communication you choose.

Here is the aforementioned video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F-TBYddQRWU
and here is an official PeaceCorps video that documents how cashews are made/processed in factories in Ghana (I’ve never been to Ghana, but I do know a lot about cashew processing and the socioeconomic chain of demand surrounding it) also I might be joining the Peace Corps so this video seems relevant: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ky8omUFpxVI

the alfredo sauce:

vegan alfredo

the roasted tomatoes:

roasted tomatoes

Julienne the roasted tomatoes and toss with cooked broccoli “fettuccine” and alfredo sauce.

vegan broccoli stalk pasta

 

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Uncategorized

I walked away from my book deal

exitLast year, I had a book deal. I worked very hard, but then I bailed. I bailed because of a book called Paleo Vegan by Ellen Jaffe Jones.

I dream about meeting her and asking why she stole my ideas. I want to know why the first sections of her book (where she explains what “paleo-vegan” means) seem stolen paraphrased directly from my blog.

I built what is now the “Paleo Vegan trend” from scratch. I did numerous searches in my college library, the public library, on PubMed and Google Scholar. I looked through Good Housekeeping editions from 1950 to 1970. I read anthropological journal articles in college that didn’t specifically pertain to the research interests I declared. I chose to develop a focus in US-Mexico borderlands and immigration in the context of public health, but still read a lot of archaeological texts and couldn’t shake the idea of “paleo vegan’ from my brain. This was 2009. The terms “paleo-vegan”, vegan-paleo, or pegan (as an MD with a blog recently coined) did not exist. Trust me. I don’t brag about a lot of things, but in terms of library and internet research…I don’t mess around.

I quit working on the book and gave up because I couldn’t justify to the publisher the reasons why I think eating corn is paleo. This was taken out of context, and I couldn’t find a way to explain the entire archaeological record in a Skype meeting with a 60-minute time limit.

I often regret backing out, because I could probably own a yacht right now had I bitten the bullet and said “oops, my mistake, I’ve become so much more profound a scholar since the days when I ate corn. I no longer think it’s paleo…haha…next question? I’ll take my $25,000 up-front payment now, thanks.”

The thing is, I still eat corn. Not corn products i.e. corn-derived ingredients such as high-fructose corn syrup, or byproducts e.g. maltodextrin, but I eat purple corn. I sometimes eat hominy. But I really frickin love grilled corn, husked and cooked on a flame, by a woman in Guatemala who sells them on the street and serves them in the husk, with a slice of lime. It’s perhaps literally my favorite thing to eat in the world, so to denounce corn in my book would not seem genuine.

I sort of regret not selling out, but in most ways I don’t. Even though others have literally paraphrased my words, and I essentially lost the book deal of a lifetime, I’m still the original paleo-vegan. I hope to find a way to connect with someone else who offers me a book deal—someone or some entity who listens when I send them academic documents and journal articles as evidence to prove my point about corn.

Sorry for ranting, but I needed to.

Please comment, dear readers. I think I need your input during this time of frustration.

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Beverages, Budget, Guatemalan

Backpacker’s Guide to Guatemala: Hydration

nueva-santa-catarina-ixtahuacan-solola-guatemala-ninos-agua-2

To stay hydrated when backpacking in Guatemala, think like a local. In most municipal towns, you will find a central park or square with large tubs of free agua potable (filtered water suitable for drinking) from which you can fill your water bottle. When you run into situations that deny access to a source of free water, you have a few options.

Bags of Agua Potable

For less than 1Q or 50 cents USD, you can generally find purified water in 12oz plastic bags. If you lack a water bottle or container to pour it into, bite a small hole in the corner and drink it the way the locals do. To be safe re: avoiding germs, use a bit of rubbing alcohol to sanitize the bag beforehand. A 2oz container of rubbing alcohol is always ideal to have on hand, in cases such as this and also as part of the mini first-aid kit you should carry with you at all times.

Portable Water Filter

I carried a portable water filter while backpacking in Ecuador, but found I didn’t need it. In Ecuador they treat the tap water with iodine, which makes it safe to drink. In Guatemala, I’m fairly certain my travel companion brought one. However, I never used it and I don’t think he did either; from prior experience backpacking through Latin America we learned that tap water, when boiled, is perfectly safe to drink. That aside, when I researched water filters in 2010 in preparation for Ecuador, I found limited options in terms of portability and convenience. Five years later, the google search results instantaneously pointed to the LifeStraw, which boasts that it allows you to procure drinking water from “virtually any source” without the aftertaste characteristic of other portable filters. Also, for every LifeStraw water filter sold, a child in Africa receives clean water for an entire school year.

Iodine Tablets

You can buy these in Guatemala, but they’re not very expensive in the states i.e. at REI or online. It’s never a bad idea to have some on hand, should you run into a sticky situation e.g. you arrive at a border crossing and can barely speak to the guard because you’re parched, having run out of water—and with no tiendas in sight, all you have to work with is the questionable cup of tap water offered to you so you can speak up and explain that it is you in the passport photo, despite the fact that your signature has changed significantly since you were 16 and you are now blonde with a very short haircut as opposed to a brunette with dreads.

Clearly, brands other than Potable Aqua Water Treatment Tablets exist. I have thorough experience with this brand however, and endorse it over other brands I’ve tried.

Boiled Water

Boiling is the safest, most tried and true method of water purification. Buy a lightweight metal pot from an open-air market in Guatemala, and carry it with you when you travel. Keep the iodine tablets on hand for times when you don’t have access to a stove or flame. If you’re in the highlands and it’s freezing, and you spot a woman selling a hot beverage reminiscent of water—typically a very weak coffee with sugar or panela—drink it. It’s boiled to a temperature high enough to melt the sugarcane. It’s purified liquid that will hydrate you, so be prepared to bite the bullet and ingest some sugar. If made traditionally, the sugar is pure sugarcane juice added to water. When you find yourself in a situation like this, without the convenience of tiendas and with a crowd of angry locals behind you screaming in Spanish to the guard that you’re a imposing tourist wasting their time…as you collect yourself, nervously awaiting a sentence of 5-10 in a Mexican prison, the dietary consequences of boiled panela water will seem insignificant.

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