Mineral Makeup, Diy

mineral-makeup-how-toThe follow-up to my previous post about mineral makeup…this is the first in a series in which I will explain how to make it yourself.

How to Make Mineral Makeup

Ingredients

8 tsp Titanium Dioxide
3 tsp Mica
4 tsp Zinc Oxide
1 tsp Magnesium Stearate
Iron oxide in naturally-sourced yellow, red, and brown pigments
Mortar & Pestle or coffee grinder
Sifter jars

The amount of yellow, red, and brown iron oxide pigments will depend upon your skin tone.

In the mortar or grinder, you will need to combine the titanium dioxinde, mica, zinc oxide, and magnesium searate with the proper combination of pigments to suit your skin tone. I will explain how to do this later. As a reference, here is the mixture I use that matches my skin, including the measurements of titanium dioxide, mica, zinc oxide, and magnesium searate that should be used in the formula no matter what your skin tone:

Mineral Makeup – Blends I Use

In Late Fall/Winter, or in cold climates:
4 Tbsp Titanium dioxide
4 tsp Zinc oxide
4 tsp Mica
3 tsp Yellow iron
1 tsp Brown iron oxide
1/8 tsp Red iron oxide

In Spring/Summer, or in tropical climates:
4 Tbsp Titanium dioxide
4 tsp Zinc oxide
4 tsp Mica
3 tsp Yellow iron oxide
1/2 tsp Brown iron oxide
1/8 tsp Red iron oxide

*In other words, I double the Brown iron oxide in warmer months but don’t change the other pigments. It’s sort of like adding bronzer, but more subtly.

When I started researching how to make my own mineral makeup in 2008 I found a book in my college library from the 1970s that explained all of this very well. I made copies in order to make my own mineral makeup, and by the grace of whomever I found them recently. Despite the generalizations of skin tones as “light”, “medium”, and “dark”, I think these serve as a decent base from which to fine-tune accordingly (to suit every individual).

**I found these in a 1970s book called “Natural Beauty”. They are not my words**

Dark

3 Tbsp Titanium dioxide
3 tsp Zinc oxide
3 tsp Mica
4 1/2 tsp Brown iron oxide
1/2 tsp Red iron oxide
1/2 tsp Yellow iron oxide

Medium

Titanium dioxide 5 Tbsp
Zinc oxide 5 tsp
4 1/2 tsp Mica
1 tsp Brown iron oxide
Red iron oxide 1/2 tsp
6 tsp Yellow iron oxide

Light

4 Tbsp Titanium dioxide
4 tsp Zinc oxide
4 tsp Mica
3 tsp Yellow iron oxide
1/2 tsp Brown iron oxide
1/8 tsp Red iron oxide

After researching more I found that these color combinations are the basic prototypes for most commercial foundations (mineral or otherwise). This may account for the fact that many people can’t find a foundation that suits their skin tone, since no skin tone is exactly the same. After making my own for so long I developed a pigment that I think now resembles mine, yet how can I begin to write a tutorial explaining how to create a blend that matches your unique skin tone? I will have to learn more before claiming to know this in an authoritative sense. So stay tuned. I will learn more about color palates and mineral combinations for different skin types and share them with you. Back the method:

Method

Use your morter/pestle or grinder to pulverize the ingredients until it resembles a loose powder of a uniform color.

Transfer to a container that you can easily use a brush with. *If you’re like me and saved makeup tins or old mineral makeup containers i.e. bare minerals or the like–then you’re in luck. Otherwise, any plastic or glass container that closes tightly will do the trick.

Mineral Makeup – Troubleshooting

In general:
If you see too much yellow for your natural skin tone, add more red oxide.
If the color looks overly pink, add more yellow oxide.
If the color looks too light add a pinch more brown iron oxide.
If the color looks too dark, add more titanium dioxide.
To cover blemishes add more zinc oxide, but beware of over-doing it since adding too much can create too much of an ash tone.

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